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Erection of Parachute Regiment flags prompts anger

April 1, 2019

The recent appearance of a number of British Army Parachute Regiment flags on lampposts near Newry has prompted anger.

Around five of the flags were erected during last week along the main Newry-Armagh Road, at Latt on the outskirts of the city.

The flying of the flags appeared to coincide with the news that one British soldier is to be prosecuted for his role in Bloody Sunday.  ‘Soldier F’ will be tried in connection with the deaths of two people and the attempted murder of four others.  Thirteen people were killed and 15 wounded after members of the Army’s Parachute Regiment opened fire on civil rights demonstrators in Derry’s Bogside on January 30 1972. A 14th person died in hospital.

Spokesperson for republican party Saoradh, Stephen Murney, angrily condemned the erection of the flags, claiming the move only serves to “heighten tensions” in the area.

He said: “There is no reason for sectarian bigots to erect Parachute Regiment flags in this area other than to provoke and heighten tensions.  This is a slap in the face to those murdered by the Parachute Regiment in the Ballymurphy Massacre and Bloody Sunday, in particular given the recent fiasco surrounded ‘Soldier F’.

© NewRayPics.com 25 Mar 2019 Northern Ireland – around 5 Parachute Regiment flags have also been erected on the main Newry – Armagh Road in an area known as Latt, which is on the outskirts of Newry City. This appears to have happened after it was announced that a ‘Soldier F’ will be prosecuted for his role in the deaths of two people on Bloody Sunday, and the attempted murder of four others. Thirteen people were killed and 15 wounded after members of the Army’s Parachute Regiment opened fire on civil rights demonstrators in Derry’s Bogside on January 30, 1972. A 14th person died in hospital. The flying of the flags is in direct contravention of the flags protocol put forward by the Loyalist Communities Council which states that flags should only be flown between June and September, should be flown in a “respectful” manner and not in a way to be used for provocative purposes. picture Newraypics.com

“The neanderthals responsible for erecting these flags offer nothing to society. The decent people of Newry, and beyond, will be sickened by these flags, and rightly so, given the British Army’s track record of death, destruction and murder in this area.”

The erection of the flags is in direct contravention of the Flags protocol put forward by the Loyalist Communities Council, which states that flags should only be flown between June and September, should be flown in a “respectful” manner and not in a way to be used for provocative purposes.

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